William James once said, “The best use of life is to spend it for something that outlasts it.”

 

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Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, made the newspapers recently and it wasn’t even Groundhog Day. Did you read about Donald Wyman? He was by himself in the woods when he was pinned down by a falling tree. There was no way to get free. There was no one to help. With nothing but his pocket knife, he amputated his own leg, dragged himself to his pickup and made it to the hospital.

When they interviewed him he said: “It was a terrible ordeal…I had a life-and-death situation, and that was my only choice – life or death. I have so much to live for that I did the only thing I could – I chose life.”

-From “Get A Life” James Harnish – Preaching May/June 1999

 

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Students
get interesting advice from speakers at graduation ceremonies. Former NBC anchor,
Tom Brokaw, said this to 2005 graduates from Emory University: “Here is
a secret that no one has told you: Real life is junior high. The world that
you are about to enter is filled with junior high, adolescent pettiness; pubescent
rivalries; the insecurities of 13-year-olds; and the false bravado of 14-year-olds.

 

_______________

J.
Michael Shannon is professor of preaching at Cincinnati Bible College in Cincinnati,
OH.

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A few years ago a friend of ours visited with hotel entrepreneur Conrad Hilton. As they separated an exchange of calling cards took place. Our friend shares Mr. Hilton’s quote, “Food for Thought,” which appears on the card: “In 1923, a very important meeting was held at the Edgewater Beach Hotel in Chicago. Attending this meeting were nine of the world’s most successful financiers. Those present were:

The president of the largest independent steel company; the president of the largest utility company; the president of the largest gas company; the greatest wheat speculator; the president of the New York Stock Exchange; a member of the president’s cabinet; the greatest “bear” in Wall Street; head of the world’s greatest monopoly; president of the Bank of International Settlements.

Certainly we must admit that here were gathered a group of the world’s most successful men. At least, men who had found the secret of “making money.” Twenty-five years later let’s see where these men are:

The president of the largest independent steel company – Charles Schwab – died bankrupt and lived on borrowed money for five years before his death; the president of the largest utility company – Samual Insull – died a fugitive from justice and penniless in a foreign land; the president of the largest gas company – Howard Hospson – is now insane; the greatest wheat speculator – Arthur Cutten – died abroad – insolvent; the president of the New York Stock Exchange – Richard Whitney – was recently released from Sing Sing Penitentiary; the member of the president’s cabinet – Albert Fall – suicide; the president of the Bank of International Settlements – Leon Fraser – died of suicide.”

“All of these men learned well the art of making money but not one of them learned how to live.”

-Shirl K Evans, Jr.

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Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, made the newspapers recently and it wasn’t even
Groundhog Day. Did you read about Donald Wyman? He was by himself in the woods
when he was pinned down by a falling tree. There was no way to get free. There
was no one to help. With nothing but his pocket knife, he amputated his own leg,
dragged himself to his pickup and made it to the hospital.
When they interviewed him, he said: “It was a terrible ordeal … I had a
life-and-death situation, and that was my only choice — life or death. I have
so much to live for that I did the only thing I could — I chose life”

_____________________________
Illustration from: “Get A Life” James Harnish, Hyde Park United Methodist Church,
Tampa, Florida

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Joe Piscatella is the author of several widely-read books on health including
Don’t Eat Your Heart Out and Controlling Your Fat Tooth. He often gives
lectures around the country encouraging people to live healthier lives. One of
his lectures is entitled: “Life Is Not a Dress Rehearsal” In one
sense, we would agree with that. We need to make the most of life here on
earth, in terms of health, in terms of service, in terms of characters. Of
course, there is another sense in which life here really is a dress rehearsal.
We are preparing here for life hereafter.

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The name of Curtis G. Lloyd is famous in botanical and pharmaceutical circles.
The Lloyd Library in Cincinnati, Ohio, is named for him and his brother. He is
buried in his hometown of Crittenden, Kentucky. The marker is most interesting.
On one side it says,


Monument Erected in 1929


By Himself, For Himself, During His Lifetime


To Please His own Vanity


What Fools These Mortals Be


On the other side the monument reads:

Curtis G. Lloyd


Born in 1859


Died 60 or More Years Afterward


The Exact Number of Years Months and Days That He Lived


Nobody Knows and Nobody Cares.

But Somebody does know and Somebody does care! If the very hairs of our head
are numbered, if a sparrow cannot fall without God’s notice, then no one is
beyond God’s knowledge and care.

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