In a recent Dennis the Menace
comic panel, Dennis is depicted at a picnic table with his parents.
The table contains a picnic basket, a plate of fried chicken, cold
drinks, a gelatin salad and the people wearing smiling faces. Dennis
said to his parents, “I think this is gonna be one of my good ol’ days.”
Leave it to Dennis to remind us of the joy of simple things. If we
want great memories, we need to make them today.

_______________
J. Michael Shannon is professor of preaching at Cincinnati Bible College in Cincinnati, OH.

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About The Author

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

I’m
sure we all continue to miss Charles Schulz and the wonderful messages he taught
through his characters in Peanuts.  There is an old Peanuts strip
that shows Charlie Brown and Schroeder walking and in a deep discussion.  Schroeder
asks, “Is Snoopy a hunting dog?”  “I guess he is in a way,” says Charlie Brown. 
Schroeder then asks, “What does he hunt, animals or birds?”  “Neither,” says
Charlie, “What he hunts for mostly is an easier way of life.”  We may all be
tempted to join that hunt.  Maybe we ought to hunt for a more fulfilling way
of life.

_______________

J.
Michael Shannon is professor of preaching at Cincinnati Bible College in Cincinnati,
OH.

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About The Author

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

A University of Southern California study found
that greater wealth didn’t translate into greater happiness. The
survey monitored the lives of approximately 1,500 people over the
course of thirty years. Richard Easterlin, a professor at USC, says
that instead of money, time with family and good health tends to make
people happy. Easterlin added that one reason wealth doesn’t
necessarily lead to happiness is because people with more money
usually want more things. We can only wonder how much time and money
was expended to come to this conclusion. Those who have studied the
scriptures have known this for some time, because the Bible tells us
so.

_______________

J. Michael Shannon is professor of preaching at Cincinnati Bible College in Cincinnati, OH.

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About The Author

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

Where is Happiness?

Not in money – Jay Gould, the American millionaire, had an enormous fortune. When dying, he said, “I suppose I am the most miserable man on earth.”

Not in pleasure – Lord Byron lived a life of pleasure and ease. He wrote: “The worm, the canker and grief are mine alone.”

Not in military glory – Alexander the Great conquered the known world in his day. Then he wept, “There are no more worlds to conquer.”

Not in political power – William Tweed became the brilliant boss of Tammany Hall and ruled New York City. He said: “My life has been a failure in everything.”

Not in unbelief – Voltaire was an infidel of the most pronounced type. He wrote: “I wish I had never been born.”

Not in position and fame – Lord Beaconsfield enjoyed more than his share of both. He wrote: “Youth is a mistake; manhood a struggle; old age a regret.”

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About The Author

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

In a recent Breakpoint commentary, Chuck Colson says, “Bad choices in all of the major areas of our lives – education, career, marriage, and more – can be traced back to mistaken beliefs about what will make us happy. The truth is that spending our whole lives chasing what we want is the best way not to find happiness. Look at the way America’s founding fathers used the phrase the pursuit of happiness. We tend to interpret those words from the Declaration of Independence to mean that we’re all entitled to do whatever we think will make us happy at any given moment-exactly the tendency that Gilbert is warning us against.

“But the founders were talking about something very different: Those words meant the freedom to make our best efforts toward living a virtuous life. They believed that this was the path toward true happiness. When we seek God’s best instead of our own, we find a higher standard by which to make our decisions-a standard that doesn’t change when our feelings do.

“As C. S. Lewis put it, ‘You can’t get second things by putting them first; you can get second things only by putting first things first.'”

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About The Author

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

Bertrand Russell once said, “I’ve made an odd discovery. Every time I talk
to a savant I become certain that happiness is no longer a possibility. Yet
when I talk to my gardener, I’m convinced of exactly the opposite.” We can
only guess what had affected the gardener. Perhaps it was working in the earth,
in close harmony with nature and nature’s God. But we need not guess when it
comes to Jesus. In the beatitudes he told us all how to find happiness — even
in the midst of painful circumstance. When we follow his directions happiness
is not just possible, it is certain.

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About The Author

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.