One of the most effective of the “embedded” reporters in Iraq was David Bloom, who reported for NBC News. On his modified “Bloom-mobile” he was able to broadcast live news reports while accompanying the troops. In early April, viewers and media colleagues alike were shocked to receive news that the 39-year-old Bloom had suddenly died of a pulmonary embolism.

What most of us did not know then was that David Bloom was a committed Christian. He had grown up in a Methodist home, and within the past two years had entered a transforming relationship with Christ that had turned his life around. Writing about him recently, Chuck Colson said, “Bloom joined the New Canaan Society, a weekly men’s fellowship group . . . I met Bloom several times as a guest of that fellowship, and we became friends. I was struck by the sincerity of his Christian faith. He was hungry for knowledge of God and how his faith ought to play out in his life.”

In the last message he would ever send to his wife, Melanie, Bloom wrote: “When the moment comes in my life when you are talking about my last day, I am determined that you and others will say, ‘He was devoted to his wife and children; he was admired; he gave every ounce of his being for those whom he cared most about-not himself, but God and his family.'”

Faith in Christ makes the difference in whether or not we are ready to face death.

(David’s friends have established a trust for the benefit of his three daughters. Donations in memoriam may be sent to David Bloom Children’s Trust, c/o Latham & Watkins, 885 3rd Avenue, Suite 1000, New York, NY 10022.)


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Americans who help religious congregations not only give more time and money than people working with secular causes, but provide three-quarters of secular charity as well, according to a study that was reported in the June 27, 2002 issue of The Washington Times.

The study found that “religion-giving households” in 2000 gave 87.5 percent of all charitable contributions in the nation, for an average of $2,100 for each household. “Givers to religious congregations are dramatically more generous than others,” said the report, issued by Independent Sector, a nonprofit research organization, and the National Council of Churches.

Six in 10 American households give to a religious congregation and more than 85 percent of those also gave to secular organizations, said the study . . .

“The influence of faith extends to volunteering,” the study said, noting that 54 percent of regular worshippers also volunteer. That compares with a volunteering rate of 32 percent by Americans who do not attend a house of worship. Religious givers volunteer for secular charities as much as secular Americans, averaging about 10 hours a month. And the most actively religious people work the most volunteer hours. “In round numbers, one-third of the people give two-thirds of the time,” the report said.


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