In a recent Breakpoint commentary, Eric Metaxas says, “It was 1939, just before the outbreak of what would come to be known as the Second World War. Hitler was on the move, the dominoes were starting to fall. The British government, facing what Winston Churchill would soon call 'an ordeal of the most grievous kind,' needed to bolster the people’s flagging spirits. So it began producing a series of propaganda posters.

"One of them, with a bold, red background, was to be used only in the event of an invasion. That invasion never came, and so the poster never was used. Yet the slogan on it has lived on, and it has particular relevance to our day. The message: 'Keep Calm and Carry On.' I like that.

"Now let’s face it, American society, while not facing an immediate existential threat, nevertheless faces cultural decay that is a direct result of our lamentable rejection of the Judeo-Christian worldview.

"Whether it’s the redefinition of marriage; continuing attacks on religious liberty; the relentless push to undermine human dignity and the protection of the unborn; fears for what’s ahead politically in this momentous election year; or whether it’s concerns about ISIS or Iran that are keeping you up at night; the fact is, 'Keep Calm and Carry On' is an appropriate watchword at this moment in American history.

"Now of course as followers of the Lord Jesus we must keep calm and carry on. It’s our duty. If this moment has taught us anything, it’s that cultural power is fleeting. In the old days, calling yourself a Christian was a sure route to respectability, whatever you believed in your heart.

"While that’s still true in some quarters, now lots more people look on matters of faith with a jaundiced eye, and growing numbers of them aren’t interested in the old American ideal of religious tolerance. Yet for all these unhappy and undeniable trends, we’re still called—you guessed it—to keep calm and carry on. We must keep standing for righteousness, come what may. God remains on His throne.” (Breakpoint.org)


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