Follow us on twitterFollow us on Facebook
You Are Here
RELATED SERMONSRELATED SERMONS
SERMONSSERMONS

The Way, the Truth, the Life (John 14:6)

By John A. Huffman, Jr.
Jesus said, "I am the way." He didn't say "a way." There was a finality with which He spoke. There was an absolute to His expression. I need to decide if it will be my way or if it will be His way. His is the way away from sin and guilt. His is the way toward restoration of all I was created to be. His is a narrow way; it is not an easy way. Jesus made that clear when He stated, "Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it. But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to life, and only a few find it" (Matthew 7:13-14).

This week I have been browsing through that classic work by John Bunyan titled The Pilgrim's Progress. It is a story of a man named Christian who determined that life in the City of Destruction was not the best existence. With the help and guidance of the Evangelist, he headed out on a journey, fraught with many perils, to the Celestial City. It describes the struggles of the Christian life. The way is not easy.

I commend this book to you as must reading for anyone who wants to get a handle on the way, God's way, through this life to heaven. Take the time to think this through. You have only one opportunity. Don't lose it. Don't let the tyranny of the urgent strip you of your freedom to decide to go God's way.

I need and want to know the way. I have decided irrevocably to take Jesus at His word and believe that He is the way. How about you? That's one ultimate you and I can commit ourselves to now!

II. I need and want to know the TRUTH.

I have discovered the hard way that the truth is not derived from my own most creative thinking. My own creative thinking helps me assess the various competing claims for truth. But ultimately, if I rely on my own philosophical quest to bring me to ultimate truth, I will never cease that quest. For there is no end to knowing and the search for meaning. I am committed to a continuing dynamic, thoughtful, intellectual existence. But I must do that within the context of confronting what Jesus said. He put it on the line when He stated: "I am the truth."

The options as I see them are quite clear.

Option one for me is that of coming to some set of philosophical truths, independent of biblical revelation, truths upon which I will build my life. There are many competing truth systems that want my allegiance. Each of them has something quite creative and helpful, as long as I do not absolutize them. It's at the moment at which I absolutize that I fall prey to the error in those systems.

Capitalism provides an economic understanding of human endeavor. To neglect the truths of such creative thinkers as Adam Smith and others is to deny some very important economic and psychological facts of life. But to sell my soul to Capitalism is to miss another whole dimension of human existence.

Karl Marx had some very important insights. He was not all wrong. So I can study Marxism and extract some truths about human existence. But to sell my soul to the whole system will commit me to error. Some of those who have made that commitment are only now beginning to realize the horrendous errors of their system.

Page   1  2  3  4  5  >
Current Issue