In his famous autobiography, Seven Storey Mountain, Thomas Merton wrote of the death of Christ and used three little prases: He was sacrificed for us, by us and with us. We understand that it was for us. We never held a hammer or drove a nail, but we know it was by us. Time means nothing to God. Jesus could die because of our sins before we’re even born. The Bible says that when we sin, we do it all over again; we “crucify Him afresh.” What does it mean that He was sacrificed with us? The apostle Paul understood it. He said that by the cross “the world is crucified unto me and I unto the world.”

 

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J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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The anniversary of the first moon landing has reminded us of some interesting details. What was the first food and drink consumed on the moon? It was the elements of the Lord’s Supper. Buzz Aldrin reports that the pastor of Webster Presbyterian Church in Houston presented him with a portable communion
kit that included a bit of unleavened bread, a small container of wine, and a small chalice. Aldrin partook shortly after the landing. The church still uses a replica of
the cup that went to the moon.

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J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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?There is a legend among the gypsies of Eastern Europe that Roman soldiers were sent out to find a blacksmith to forge four nails to crucify Jesus. Finally, they found a gypsy blacksmith and paid him to do it.  When he had finished three, they said they had no time to wait for the fourth and left. Since it was paid for, he finished the fourth nail. Taking the hot spike from the forge he poured water on it, but it still glowed. He dropped it in water, but it still glowed. He buried it in the sand, but it still glowed red. He dropped it into a well with no effect. All the rest of his life he was bothered by the glow that would not go out. 
That story is only fiction, but here is a fact: There is a glow that is kindled in our hearts when we come around the Lord’s table. This glow will be with us until we return to have it kindled once again.

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J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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In the heart of Quebec City is a church called Our Lady of the Victories. It was built to commemorate two victories won by the French over the British in 1690 and 1711. But, these victories were not long lasting. Eventually, the British defeated the French and Canada has been British ever since. The Lord’s Supper commemorates a victory – one that has had lasting impact in every century since. It is not only a mon­ument to a great eternal victory, but it is a living memorial.

 

 

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J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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Before
he can serve Communion, a Russian Orthodox priest must put on proper garments.
When he puts on the first garment he recites, “My soul rejoices in the
Lord. He has dressed me in garments of salvation and put upon me the vestments
of joy. Like a bridegroom he has placed the miter upon me and like a bride He
has surrounded me with adornment.” When he puts on the stole he says, “Praise
be to God who has poured out his grace upon His priests like precious ointment
upon the head.  Next he puts on the waistband and recites, “He has girded
me with strength and made my way irreproachable.”  Then he puts on the cuffs
that reach from wrist to elbow and says, “Thy right arm was glorified in
strength. O Lord. Thy right arm has shattered the enemy.”  Then the left arm:
“Thy hands have created me and formed me; teach me that I may know thy commandments.”
Finally, he puts on the outer vests and prays.  Those of us who partake of communion
must also make preparation, but it is spiritual and silent. We must put on the
garments of humility and reverence and thanksgiving. Only then are we ready
for Communion.

_______________

J.
Michael Shannon is professor of preaching at Cincinnati Bible College in Cincinnati,
OH.

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About The Author

J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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Tampa,
Florida has a huge annual festival called “Gasparilla Days.” It takes
its name from a pirate named Jose` Gaspar. The problem is, Jose` Gaspar never
existed at all. Many local residents claim he was invented just for the purpose
of finding an excuse to have a festival. When we come to communion, we come to
honor a man who most certainly existed. Unbelievers allow that. His enemies allow
that. But, believers will go a step further. We not only honor one who existed,
but one who still exists, who will exist forever, and who is present with us in
the celebration.

_______________

J.
Michael Shannon is professor of preaching at Cincinnati Bible College in Cincinnati,
OH.

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About The Author

J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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At the heart of the city of Indianapolis stands a towering granite monument.
About it are clustered statues depicting various scenes from the Civil War.
Carved on the stone are these words: “To Indiana’s Silent Victors.”

When we come to communion we come to honor a Victor, but He is not a silent
Victor. It was said of Abel “he still speaks, even though he is
dead.” If we change the tense of the verb we can say the same thing of
Christ. Though He died, He rose again and He speaks to our hearts. In no place
does He speak more eloquently than at the table of Communion.

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About The Author

J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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Each September in the country of Malaysia, Chinese people there celebrate the
Mooncake Festival. It is observed a time when the moon is very bright and
supposedly closer to the earth. The festival is filled with superstitions and
pagan ideas. Mooncakes are round meat pies, stuffed with eggs, pork and bean
paste. Once they were stuffed with something else as well. At the end of the
13th century in China the Chinese people planned an uprising against the ruling
Manchu dynasty. Messages were hidden in mooncakes and circulated throughout the
country. That gave the signal for the revolt. (Is that the ancestor of the
fortune cookie?) There is a message in the bread of communion, too. It is not a
message written on paper. Some eat the bread with no idea that the message is
there. But to the discerning there is a deep spiritual message in communion
bread — and that message is the very reason for Communion. The message is that
Christ died for our sins, and we must now pledge our allegiance to him.

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About The Author

J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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Jews believed that the first thing the Messiah would do was host a Messianic
banquet. In fact, the last thing Jesus did was to host a banquet — the Lord’s
Supper. The Supper doesn’t seem like a banquet. There is only a crumb of bread.
There is only a sip of wine. They are in our bodies for only a short time. But
the memory of what we have thought and felt at the Supper lasts far, far
longer. It lasts until we come again to Communion

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About The Author

J-Michael-Shannon

A third generation preacher, Mike Shannon is Professor of Preaching at Cincinnati Bible Seminary of Cincinnati Christian University. He has served as a preaching minister, church planter, and college professor. His most recent preaching ministry was at the historic First Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee. In his nearly two decades at Cincinnati Christian University, Mike has served as both professor and Dean of the Seminary. He has also been an adjunct professor at Milligan College and Northern Kentucky University. Mike is the author or co-author of several books.

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