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Preaching to Power: An Interview with Lloyd John Ogilvie

By Michael Duduit
Ogilvie: I would use a three-year process. I would spend a year with a portion of scripture as a devotional exercise. If I was going to plan to preach from the book of James, I would use that book as my devotional literature for the first year. The next year I would do an in-depth expositional study, and a reading of the great minds -- to study the expositors, the great preachers through the ages.

In the actual year of the preaching, I would take the time in my study leave to outline the presentation for a whole period of time, a portion of the year, then prepare a manila folder for each Sunday of that series, then publish a preaching guide for that period of time. I would do 45 Sundays a year in the parish, and I would come out of my study leave with 45 outlines of sermons, 45 manila folders, ready to receive the illustrative material that would go into each of them as I read, gathering illustrative materials from everyday life, and as I talked with people.

Then, as I got to the week of actually preaching a sermon, there was the devotional year's resource, the intensive study scholarship, then the practical gathering of material. Then the actual writing of the sermon -- it is very important that the writing of the sermon be fresh, not dependent on well-worn phrases and hackneyed language. After the sermon is written it takes about a day of memorization, repeating it until it becomes a part of the preacher, then preaching it with as few notes as possible.

Preaching: What was the nature of the preaching guide you published?

Ogilvie: There would be a single page for each week. I would list out the title, the text, and the development. I would actually write three clear, concise, distilled paragraphs explaining what it is that I wanted to do with that particular text. That would be sent to the director of music, and he would take that and prepare all of the music to fit with the particular theme of that Sunday. So from the beginning note of the prelude to the last note of the postlude, one central theme in all of the hymns, scripture readings, responses -- all would augment that one central theme.

Often I would add another page actually outlining the sermon as I envisioned it. Once I got to the week of the preaching of that sermon, the folder would be full of illustrative material that I had gathered through the year.

Preaching: Was most of your preaching in the form of series?

Ogilvie: Yes, I would take books of the scripture for themes. The book of James I did a series on Making Stress Work for You. I did a book on the "He is able" statements of the epistles; that became the book Lord of the Loose Ends. Then I did one on the book of Acts that was entitled The Bush is Still Burning. I did one on the "I am" statements of Christ.

Preaching: How long was a typical series for you?

Ogilvie: Usually three months, so I'd do three major series in a year. I found that brought continuity and unity to the preaching. I tried to vary them so we would cover the whole of scripture.

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